Millennial in shock after seeing childhood fashion trend back at Walmart

Alyce Collins
6 Min Read

From claw clips to bucket hats, we’ve seen plenty of fashion trends and classic hairstyles resurrected from the 2000s. But no amount of warning could have prepared this shopper for the staple noughties style that looks set to return this summer.

While wandering around Walmart recently, Shelli Herrell, 37, couldn’t help browsing the shoe section (it would be rude not to), but there was one specific style that stopped her in her tracks. Among all the newer styles, Herrell was transported back to the early 2000s after seeing some foam platform sandals, formerly a staple in every millennial’s wardrobe.

Herrell, from Glendale, Arizona, loved the black and white pair she had back in the day. She told Newsweek that they were “the only pair of shoes [she] wore for a year straight.” Well, 2024 just got a whole lot better for Herrell because now she can strut around in these comfy sandals once again and relive the good old days.

After spotting the platforms in the store, she had to spread the word and shared a video on her TikTok account (@shewwsheww). The fashion update delighted many, and the clip has already gained over 2.5 million views and more than 209,800 likes in a matter of days.

Shelli Herrell was delighted to find some platform flip-flops in her local Walmart recently. Herrell didn’t want to keep it a secret, so she instantly posted about the iconic footwear on TikTok.
Shelli Herrell was delighted to find some platform flip-flops in her local Walmart recently. Herrell didn’t want to keep it a secret, so she instantly posted about the iconic footwear on TikTok.
@shewwsheww / TikTok

Herrell said: “I’ve been seeing all these trends coming back, and I finally went to my local Walmart in hopes that they would have them in store. And to my surprise, they were there waiting for me.

“I have to admit, there’s something about seeing childhood fashion trends come back that makes me happy. I feel like there’s so much negativity in this world, and if a simple thing like sandals brings you joy, then I’m here for it.”

Like the changing seasons, fashion trends will come and go, and it’s certainly not unheard of for designers to take inspiration from the past. Some people love keeping up with the newest craze and they’ll regularly change their wardrobe according to what’s in, but not everyone is on board with that.

According to a YouGov poll of 2,000 adults, just 8 percent of people follow trends very closely, and 23 percent follow them somewhat closely. However, 34 percent of respondents said they don’t follow trends whatsoever.

Among the styles that Americans favor the most, the results highlighted that flannel shirts are a fashion staple with 63 percent of people regarding them fondly. Graphic T-shirts are also an everlasting favorite for 59 percent of respondents. But one style that was overwhelmingly disliked is sagging pants, which 77 percent of participants didn’t like.

As a “millennial mom,” Herrell loves posting about nostalgic trends that are returning and although she’s not happy about every single one, she’s delighted to see this “outfit staple” make its comeback all these years later.

Not everyone on social media agrees though, because while some people would prefer to leave these sandals in the 2000s, others couldn’t get themselves down to Walmart fast enough.

Herrell told Newsweek: “Social media is split, half are super excited and the other half are terrified they’re going to sprain an ankle again. There’s a reason why they were called ankle breakers back in the day.”

With over 5,600 comments on the viral TikTok post, plenty of people wanted to have their say on the return of this iconic trend. One comment reads: “I’m fully convinced they are just pulling everything out of the warehouse from years ago and putting it on the floor.”

Another person wrote: “I’ve already rolled my ankle 4 times and I didn’t even buy them yet.”

A third TikTok user joked: “My ancient ankles from the 1900s said no.”

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